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What dogs do when humans are not around, according to experts

The human-dog bond is ancient: we have co-evolved together since before writing even existed. Our long cohabitation with dogs has granted both species a unique insight into the other’s feelings: dogs, for instance, know when you are looking into their eyes, unlike wolves and other animals. And, dogs can understand human language to some extent: one “Guiness”-worthy dog knows over 1,000 nouns. ...

Originally posted on salon.com

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Joe Biden isn’t the first president to have secret cancer surgery — this one did it in 1893

Joe Biden is not the first president to have a secret cancer surgery.

At the time of this writing, the only confirmed facts are that a small lesion was discovered on President Biden’s skin — and that it was later found to have been cancerous. Specifically, it was a basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a common type of skin cancer with an excellent prognosis for recovery....

Originally posted on salon.com

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Plastic pollution is filtering up into the fish that we eat

As an agrarian civilization, almost all of what humans eat is farmed — with the notable exception of seafood. Aside from some farmed fish, most seafood we consume is still caught in the wild. Yet while it might seem that there is something more pure and traditional about consuming “wild” food as opposed to farmed food, the seafood that we eat soaks in a sea contaminated by plastic — and it turns out that a lot of that pollution may be making its way into our bodies via seafood. ...

Originally posted on salon.com

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Did the South assassinate this president to preserve slavery? Forensic scientists say it’s possible

President Zachary Taylor had spent most of his career in the military, and it was obvious to the trio of Southern politicians as they confronted him. They were warning their fellow Whig that he needed to abandon his support for America’s growing anti-slavery movement. The year was 1850: Taylor, in office for a mere sixteen months, staunchly opposed allowing slavery to spread into the new territories America had wrested from Mexico; and Taylor was equally adamant that the pro-slavery Texas government, which lacked a valid claim to disputed land in eastern New Mexico, should not be allowed to use armed force to seize that territory....

Originally posted on salon.com

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We asked scientists what they think of the FBI’s assessment that COVID came from a Chinese lab

Almost as soon as the COVID-19 pandemic went global in early 2020, a public debate over its origins erupted. No one doubted then, or doubts now, that the SARS-CoV-2 virus originated in China before spreading all over the world. Yet since the first humans were infected, the mainstream scientific narrative has been that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was passed from an animal to humans at a wet market....

Originally posted on salon.com

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Do people with autism feel pain more acutely? Study sheds light on a little-discussed phenomenon

There are many aspects of autism spectrum disorders that remain, for lack of a better word, mysterious. As someone who is on the autism spectrum himself, I can personally attest to such enigmatic realities as the double empathy problem, which describes how autistic and non-autistic people fundamentally differ in how they communicate....

Originally posted on salon.com

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Big Ag doesn’t want you to know about the connection between cancer and this common herbicide

It’s a tale of corporate malfeasance as old as time: corporation discovers herbicide. Corporation markets herbicide. Corporation discovers herbicide does far more than kill weeds, but attacks critics and whistleblowers ad nauseum to sweep it under the rug. 

This, according to Dr. Chadi Nabhan, is the story of glyphosate, an herbicide often marketed under the name Roundup and sold by the quart in hardware and lawn stores across the United States....

Originally posted on salon.com

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Sorry, Calvinists: A four-day workweek actually makes employees healthier, more productive

Ever since German sociologist Max Weber penned his classic 1905 book “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism,” the Western World has accepted that Calvinist-influenced societies tend to associate hard work with both virtue and material success. According to this pervasive mode of thinking, there is no such thing as “too much work.”...

Originally posted on salon.com

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