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Out-of-control heat is making Earth more “weird” — and more deadly

For the 13th consecutive month, Earth’s average monthly temperature has broken all previous records, continuing a streak that began in June 2023. Significantly, the European climate service Copernicus added that that the world has been 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than pre-industrial levels for more than a year, pushing the planet up against the threshold established by the 2015 Paris climate agreement....

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Climate change linked to brain damage in children — and poor kids are at greater risk

Perhaps the cruelest aspect of climate change is that it disproportionately impacts those least responsible for planet-cooking emissions, especially the poorest among us. Among many other things, experts predict that global heating will expose 70% of the working population to health risks and could ultimately kill roughly 1 billion people, most of them poor....

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Cold-blooded killer: Study finds climate change is driving deadly cold waves, harming wildlife

Bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) are large, voracious predators. Measuring anywhere from 7 to 11 feet from tail to snout, with dark gray skin and a white underbelly, bull sharks eat everything from fishes and dolphins to other sharks and even the occasional human. It is for that last reason that it takes a lot of gumption to attach electronic tags to wild bull sharks — yet that is precisely what scientists did in a recent study for the journal Nature....

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European wine just had its worst growing season in 62 years. Climate change could make it worse

When a team of New Zealand scientists analyzed the alcohol produced by the local vineyard Greystone Wines, they found something with profound implications for every wine drinker on the planet. The microbial ecosystems that distinguish literal wine from mere grape juice — the panoply of yeasts, bacteria and fungi — fluctuated significantly between the vintages produced in 2018 and 2021 by the North Canterbury winemaker because of human-caused climate change....

Originally posted on salon.com