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New research pinpoints Antarctica’s melty past. Scientists warn it’s happening again

Scientists have thoroughly demonstrated that we are overheating our planet by emitting greenhouse gases, with the vast majority of this (89%) coming from fossil fuels. As this process of climate change worsens, humans will continue to endure extreme weather events including intensified storms, droughts, heatwaves, wildfires and floods....

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Hundreds of elephant seals dead as bird flu hits Antarctic, raising fears penguins could be next

In a further red flag for penguin populations in Antarctica, a new report reveals that hundreds of elephants seals have been found dead. While on the surface the two trends may seem unrelated, the chair of the Antarctic Wildlife Health Network, Dr. Meagan Dewar, told The Guardian on Friday that “at some sites we’ve had mass mortalities, where we are getting into the hundreds” when it comes to elephant seal populations....

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We can’t stop Antarctica from melting, as scientists warn we are entering “uncharted territory”

Imagine a future in which sea level rise is so severe that apocalyptic floods are a regular occurrence. Hundreds of millions are displaced as their coastal regions become uninhabitable, and as humanity struggles to survive, the map of the Earth’s southernmost region gets radically redrawn. According to a recent study by the British Antarctic Society, climate change has passed a crucial tipping point for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet....

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In a first, bird flu reaches Antarctica, threatening to wipe out tons of penguins and other birds

2023 has been a bad year for emperor penguins. In August, a study in the journal Communications Earth & Environment found that the loss of polar ice in Antarctica is likely to lead to a “catastrophic breeding failure” for penguins throughout Antarctica, eventually causing them to be unable to naturally sustain their own species by the end of the century....

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Fur seals are declining thanks to lack of food and climate change, study finds

The Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) is among the most beloved sea animals, with its wet puppy dog eyes, big white whiskers, rolly poly gray body and slippery flippers. Unsurprisingly, the fur seal is almost universally regarded as adorable. The act of clubbing one for its fur is a horrific practice that has thankfully been banned — but in a way, humans are still clubbing these animals over the head with drastic changes to the global climate....

Originally posted on salon.com