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John Kerry warns that Project 2025 would be “absolutely unimaginable and destructive”

During a sweltering rally in Las Vegas on Sunday, June 9, former President Donald Trump complained to his supporters about “sweating like a dog” in the triple-digit heat. Because climate change is breaking temperature records all over the world, one might have assumed that the aspiring leader’s next act would have been to express concern for the other people at his event....

Originally posted on salon.com

Jaguars are returning to America, but Fish and Wildlife Service don’t think they need protections

On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a new regulation, effective immediately, that significantly reduces the designated territory for jaguars in the American southwest. The new and final rule removes 64,797 acres of the jaguar’s critical habitat designation, in compliance with an earlier court ruling. That leaves approximately 640,000 acres for the jaguars across Cochise, Pima and Santa Cruz counties....

Originally posted on salon.com

Cold-blooded killer: Study finds climate change is driving deadly cold waves, harming wildlife

Bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) are large, voracious predators. Measuring anywhere from 7 to 11 feet from tail to snout, with dark gray skin and a white underbelly, bull sharks eat everything from fishes and dolphins to other sharks and even the occasional human. It is for that last reason that it takes a lot of gumption to attach electronic tags to wild bull sharks — yet that is precisely what scientists did in a recent study for the journal Nature....

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Before reaching the ocean, the Colorado River becomes a trickle. New research reveals where it goes

The Colorado River is a 1,450-mile-behemoth, its raging waters carving their way through seven U.S. and two Mexican states. It is arguably the central attraction of the Grand Canyon, one of the world’s most famous natural wonders. But it does more than look beautiful — some forty million people depend on the river for their water and hydroelectric power, not to mention the fish and wildlife who also share it with us....

Originally posted on salon.com

Buzzkill: Climate change could destroy the coffee industry. Here’s how we can still save it

Our industrial society is underpinned by drug use, though we don’t typically think of it as such. After all, two out of three Americans drink coffee daily, according to the National Coffee Association. The American coffee market is expected to exceed $28 billion in 2024 and the industry creates 2.2 million jobs a year, which in turn generates more than $100 billion in wages for employees....

Originally posted on salon.com