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Our blood is teeming with “forever chemicals.” Can we remove them by donating blood?

In their daily job of protecting lives, firefighters are exposed to a lot of hazards — not just smoke and fire, but unsafe traffic, violence and vicious cats in trees. However, one of the most perilous risks in firefighting can be somewhat invisible: so-called “forever chemicals,” the substances that are use to suppress fires, such as in fire extinguishers and foams dumped on wildfires....

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Forty-six million Americans are drinking “forever chemicals” in their tap water, report finds

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on Thursday that so-called “forever chemicals” exist at unsafe levels in the drinking water of roughly 46 million Americans. Specifically, the toxic chemicals known as PFAS (per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances) were present in one out of four public drinking water systems in quantities at or above the agency’s minimum reporting levels....

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“Forever chemicals” are everywhere: Here are the 6 products most likely to be in your home

When a person hears the term “forever chemicals,” it is unlikely that their immediate reaction is, “Yum! I want that inside my body!” Yet these so-called forever chemicals — technically known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), as well as chemicals like bisphenols— are absolutely everywhere. It is a statistical certainty that a person reading this article has forever chemicals in their bloodstream, and perhaps in other tissues....

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“Regrettable substitutions”: Why it’s hard to ban “forever” chemicals, according to experts

Teflon is probably the most famous of the “forever chemicals,” but it is far from alone among them. Although one would hope that governments would heavily regulate a product linked to serious health issues like cancer, high blood pressure and infertility, chemicals known as PFAS (short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are largely able to slip under the radar....

Originally posted on salon.com

How did nonstick “forever chemicals” get into our food? Blame pesticides

Pesticides have come under increased scrutiny in recent years. From the discovery that the herbicide glyphosate is in 80 percent of Americans’ urine to concerns that weedkillers’ neonicotinoids in pesticides are killing off bees, scientists keep amassing alarming information about the products ostensibly intended to protect our food. Now a recent study by a nonprofit focused on protecting the environment reveals a new problem with pesticides: They are filled with forever chemicals, a class of compound that is typically used in nonstick and waterproof surfaces....

Originally posted on salon.com