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Sick, hot world: Climate change favors disease vectors, threatening to unleash more pandemics

Global heating has so profoundly altered our planet that some experts argue it’s no longer about a changing climate and instead about a changed climate. In other words, the hotter world, more chaotic world predicted by climate scientists is part of our present, not just our future. And those changes extend beyond rising sea levels and heat waves to how diseases spread and impact society....

Originally posted on salon.com

Pfizer is more than doubling the cost of COVID drug Paxlovid to $1,390 per course

Pfizer — the American pharmaceutical company that helped manufacture the COVID-19 vaccine — announced on Wednesday that it is hiking the price of its antiviral drug Paxlovid to $1,390 per course, starting in 2024. In a story first reported by The Wall Street Journal, a company spokesman confirmed that Pfizer plans on more than doubling the $529 that the federal government paid for Paxlovid....

Originally posted on salon.com

COVID-19 is just the beginning: Climate change is bringing a lot more diseases with it

In the hit HBO series “The Last of Us,” humanity must battle a malevolent fungus that arises due to climate change and turns people into zombies. While “The Last of Us” is a science fiction thriller and its fungus could actually save the world rather than destroy it, the notion that climate change might cause pandemics or epidemics is hardly limited to fiction....

Originally posted on salon.com

We asked scientists what they think of the FBI’s assessment that COVID came from a Chinese lab

Almost as soon as the COVID-19 pandemic went global in early 2020, a public debate over its origins erupted. No one doubted then, or doubts now, that the SARS-CoV-2 virus originated in China before spreading all over the world. Yet since the first humans were infected, the mainstream scientific narrative has been that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was passed from an animal to humans at a wet market....

Originally posted on salon.com