logo

New Moon research yields tantalizing clues about its geological history

The Moon has a long, chaotic geological history almost as old as Earth itself. Every crater, rock and speck of dust on the Moon tells a story, but because it’s not exactly close to our planet, this history is a little harder to study than say, the Grand Canyon.

Astronomers theorize that Moon craters were formed from celestial objects like asteroids and comets crashing into its surface....

Originally posted on salon.com

Three-body solution: These massive blue stars may not be duos, but threesomes instead

Be stars are weird. They are rapidly rotating stars about 4 to 18 times larger than the sun, but a pleasing blue color surrounded by discs of gas, not unlike the rings of Saturn. They spin so fast that they approach “critical velocity” or the point where they would otherwise blast apart due to centrifugal force overpowering the star’s gravity....

Originally posted on salon.com

The Large Hadron Collider has been used to detect every known particle except neutrinos. Until now

Neutrinos are some of the most enigmatic particles in all of physics. Sporting a neutral charge and a mass close to zero, neutrinos rarely interact with other matter and as such have been notoriously difficult to observe. Scientists have still learned a great deal about them — including identifying three neutrino types (electron, muon and tau particles) — but observing them has been quite another matter....

Originally posted on salon.com

Oppenheimer’s hero Niels Bohr has a legacy as complicated as the “father of the atomic bomb”

In Christopher Nolan’s hit biopic “Oppenheimer,” real-life Danish physicist Niels Bohr is more than just a major character. As depicted by Shakespearean actor Kenneth Branagh, he is a living legend, looming large both over the film’s depiction of the Manhattan Project and over the psyche of the titular protagonist himself, J....

Originally posted on salon.com